Everest – Najtazsia Cesta (The Hard Way)

Everest – Najtazsia Cesta (The Hard Way)

Slovakia

2020

54 min

Watch
Watch

Slovakia

2020

54 min

Watch

Watch

When Chris Bonington and his team set out in 1975 to climb the south-west face of Mount Everest, the steepest and highest face in the world, they were attempting the ultimate mountaineering challenge that many previous expeditions had tried unsuccessfully. In August, 1975 the 18-member British expedition assisted by Sherpas and supplementary oxygen, reached the top. Bonington called the route leading through the face the “Hard Way.” In his bestselling book of the same name, he wrote that although Alpine style climbing — without supplementary oxygen, fixed ropes, and the assistance of Sherpas — is increasingly popular in the Himalayas, it was impossible to scale the south-west face in this manner. This has become a challenge for a younger generation of mountaineers, including a group of climbers from Slovakia. All remarkable events appear as madness at the beginning. People row their boats into the unknown, walk through endless snowy moors, descend into the depths of the earth. Some are attracted by the highest mountains in the world, by the hardest ways to get to the top. It is a way to find out what humans can do.

When Chris Bonington and his team set out in 1975 to climb the south-west face of Mount Everest, the steepest and highest face in the world, they were attempting the ultimate mountaineering challenge that many previous expeditions had tried unsuccessfully. In August, 1975 the 18-member British expedition assisted by Sherpas and supplementary oxygen, reached the top. Bonington called the route leading through the face the “Hard Way.” In his bestselling book of the same name, he wrote that although Alpine style climbing — without supplementary oxygen, fixed ropes, and the assistance of Sherpas — is increasingly popular in the Himalayas, it was impossible to scale the south-west face in this manner. This has become a challenge for a younger generation of mountaineers, including a group of climbers from Slovakia. All remarkable events appear as madness at the beginning. People row their boats into the unknown, walk through endless snowy moors, descend into the depths of the earth. Some are attracted by the highest mountains in the world, by the hardest ways to get to the top. It is a way to find out what humans can do.

Original Language

English/ German/ Slovak/ Czech

Direction

Pavol Barabas

Camera

Pavol Barabas

Editing

Robo Karovic

Sound

Martin Mere

Script

Marek Tapak

Producer

Alena Koscova

Filmmaker

Filmmaker

Pavol Barabáš (1959) makes large-scale mountain-oriented and adventure films about how people survive in extreme conditions, in inaccessible wilderness, on wild rivers and glacial peaks, and in deep caves. Barabáš is especially attracted by the territories of Tibetan Buddhism and the lands of people who live deep in the jungle. His films show how we should treat the earth, with love and respect for nature, mental strength, and a moral conscience. Barabáš has been part of ground-breaking expeditions, including the co-discovery of a mega-cave on the Chimantá plateau and the first transit of the Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica, and made much loved films about the Slovak mountains. Barabáš has won over 300 national and international prizes, including the Grand Prize from the International Alliance for Mountain Film for filmmakers, directors, and producers who have contributed throughout to the evolution of mountain film into the prominent genre that it is today. His films include Svetozár Stračina (2019), Spirit of Jaguar, (2018), The Polarman (2014), Pygmies – The Children of The Jungle (2011), Everest – Juzek Psotka (2008), Tepuy – A Journey To The Dephts Of The Earth (2007), Mustang, (2001), and 80 Metres Below The Summit (1997).

Pavol Barabáš (1959) makes large-scale mountain-oriented and adventure films about how people survive in extreme conditions, in inaccessible wilderness, on wild rivers and glacial peaks, and in deep caves. Barabáš is especially attracted by the territories of Tibetan Buddhism and the lands of people who live deep in the jungle. His films show how we should treat the earth, with love and respect for nature, mental strength, and a moral conscience. Barabáš has been part of ground-breaking expeditions, including the co-discovery of a mega-cave on the Chimantá plateau and the first transit of the Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica, and made much loved films about the Slovak mountains. Barabáš has won over 300 national and international prizes, including the Grand Prize from the International Alliance for Mountain Film for filmmakers, directors, and producers who have contributed throughout to the evolution of mountain film into the prominent genre that it is today. His films include Svetozár Stračina (2019), Spirit of Jaguar, (2018), The Polarman (2014), Pygmies – The Children of The Jungle (2011), Everest – Juzek Psotka (2008), Tepuy – A Journey To The Dephts Of The Earth (2007), Mustang, (2001), and 80 Metres Below The Summit (1997).

Contact

K2 studio s.r.o.

Oráčska 18 831 06 Bratislava www.pavolbarabas.sk
k2@k2studio.sk

Contact

K2 studio s.r.o.

Oráčska 18 831 06 Bratislava www.pavolbarabas.sk
k2@k2studio.sk