Das Riesending (The Giant Thing)

Das Riesending (The Giant Thing)

Germany

2021

90 min

Watch
Watch

Germany

2021

90 min

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The Riesending is Germany’s deepest, longest shaft cave. The rocky corridors wind downwards for almost 25km into the Untersberg Mountain, descending 1,200m through a spectacular subterranean landscape. The film joins an elite team of explorers as they journey into one of the most difficult caves in the world, seeking its end point. , the only people ever to have been granted permission to do so. Specialised light-sensitive, lightweight cameras and lighting help provide a glimpse into the incredible underground world many days away from the earth’s surface. The cliffs inside are higher than the world’s highest church tower. The cavers pass through claustrophobic bottlenecks and vast chasms, through tunnels and past torrential waterfalls. They abseil a towering cliff above a black abyss, in a scene that belongs to Jules Verne or Tolkien, and cross an underground lake in an inflatable dinghy. They get soaked by chilly waterfalls and covered in thick mud. They spend days at three degrees, sleeping on beds of rock, without a glimmer of daylight. These cavers are explorers in the true sense of the word. This underground journey is perhaps the greatest adventure that can be found in todays well-mapped and organized industrial world.

The Riesending is Germany’s deepest, longest shaft cave. The rocky corridors wind downwards for almost 25km into the Untersberg Mountain, descending 1,200m through a spectacular subterranean landscape. The film joins an elite team of explorers as they journey into one of the most difficult caves in the world, seeking its end point. , the only people ever to have been granted permission to do so. Specialised light-sensitive, lightweight cameras and lighting help provide a glimpse into the incredible underground world many days away from the earth’s surface. The cliffs inside are higher than the world’s highest church tower. The cavers pass through claustrophobic bottlenecks and vast chasms, through tunnels and past torrential waterfalls. They abseil a towering cliff above a black abyss, in a scene that belongs to Jules Verne or Tolkien, and cross an underground lake in an inflatable dinghy. They get soaked by chilly waterfalls and covered in thick mud. They spend days at three degrees, sleeping on beds of rock, without a glimmer of daylight. These cavers are explorers in the true sense of the word. This underground journey is perhaps the greatest adventure that can be found in todays well-mapped and organized industrial world.

Original Language

German

Direction

Petra Höfer/ Freddie Röckenhaus

Camera

Thomas Matthalm/ Katharina Bitzer/ Robbie Shone

Editing

Johannes Fritsche

Script

Petra Höfer/ Freddie Röckenhaus

Producer

Petra Höfer/ Freddie Röckenhaus

Filmmaker

Filmmaker

20,000 Meters Under the Earth was written by Petra Höfer and Freddie Röckenhaus, directed by Freddie Röckenhaus and produced by colourFIELD. The award-winning duo, described as “the Lennon-McCartney of German documentary”, have produced more than 80 full-length documentaries, documentary series, and docudramas related to science and education, including the 13-part series and movie, Germany from Above, the most successful documentary ever in Germany. Before making films, Röckenhaus was staff editor of Die Zeit and Süddeutsche Zeitung, and won the German Pulitzer equivalent, the Henri Nannen Preis in 2005. Höfer was an editor for die tageszeitung and Monitor. colourFIELD productions include the series Beautiful Minds-Voyage Into The Brain, licensed in more than 60 countries, Automatic Brain, The Virus Empire, Migrating Birds-Scouts of Distant Worlds, and Tropic Fever. The couple produced the documentary Love in Power, about Michelle and Barack Obama. Höfer and Röckenhaus won the German Television Prize (Deutscher Fernsehpreis) in 2007, the French PariScience Award (2012), the German Camera Prize (2011), Deutscher Naturfilm-Preis (2017), the Heinz- Sielmann-Preis, and the Georg-von- Holtzbrinck-Prize for Science Films (2018).

20,000 Meters Under the Earth was written by Petra Höfer and Freddie Röckenhaus, directed by Freddie Röckenhaus and produced by colourFIELD. The award-winning duo, described as “the Lennon-McCartney of German documentary”, have produced more than 80 full-length documentaries, documentary series, and docudramas related to science and education, including the 13-part series and movie, Germany from Above, the most successful documentary ever in Germany. Before making films, Röckenhaus was staff editor of Die Zeit and Süddeutsche Zeitung, and won the German Pulitzer equivalent, the Henri Nannen Preis in 2005. Höfer was an editor for die tageszeitung and Monitor. colourFIELD productions include the series Beautiful Minds-Voyage Into The Brain, licensed in more than 60 countries, Automatic Brain, The Virus Empire, Migrating Birds-Scouts of Distant Worlds, and Tropic Fever. The couple produced the documentary Love in Power, about Michelle and Barack Obama. Höfer and Röckenhaus won the German Television Prize (Deutscher Fernsehpreis) in 2007, the French PariScience Award (2012), the German Camera Prize (2011), Deutscher Naturfilm-Preis (2017), the Heinz- Sielmann-Preis, and the Georg-von- Holtzbrinck-Prize for Science Films (2018).

Contact

Nioni O’Hara

ColourFIELD tell-a-vision

Gutenbergstr 3444139 Dortmund

Germany

niomi@colourfield.de

Contact

Nioni O’Hara

ColourFIELD tell-a-vision

Gutenbergstr 3444139 Dortmund

Germany

niomi@colourfield.de